UK National Trust Bans Easter To Appease Muslims


English Prime Minister Theresa May has hammered the English National Trust for endeavoring to "artificially glamorize Christianity from English life" after the association prohibited utilization of "Easter" from it's prevalent across the country Easter egg chase. 

The National Trust holds an Easter egg chase that sees a huge number of kids scan for chocolate eggs at a considerable lot of its chronicled properties every year. In any case, this year it has been rebranded to evacuate any reference to the Christian heavenly week. 
Chocolate firm Cadbury, which supports the occasion, said they evacuated all reference to Easter so as to speak to non-Christians. "We welcome individuals from all religions and none to make the most of our occasional treats," they said. 

In any case, talking in the Saudi capital Riyadh, the Executive disclosed to ITV News: "I'm not only a vicar's girl – I'm an individual from the National Trust too. I think the position they've taken is completely absurd and I don't recognize what really matters to.

“Easter’s very important. It’s important to me, it’s a very important festival for the Christian faith for millions across the world.
“So I think what the National Trust is doing is frankly just ridiculous.
Breitbart report:


The Archbishop of York also hit out at Cadbury, accusing the company of “spitting on the grave” of its Quaker founder.

“If people visited Birmingham today in the Cadbury World they will discover how [John] Cadbury’s Christian faith influenced his industrial output,” he said.
He built houses for all his workers, he built a church, he made provision for schools etc.  It is obvious that for him Jesus and justice were two sides of the one coin.
“To drop Easter from Cadbury’s Easter Egg Hunt in my book is tantamount to spitting on the grave of Cadbury.”
There are increasing instances of Christianity being airbrushed from British public life as ignorance of the country’s traditional faith grows.
In 2014, Oxford City Council refused to give permission for a “Passion play” – a re-enactment of the trial and crucifixion of Christ – to take place in the city’s streets because an official thought the word “passion” meant it was a sex show.
Oxford City Councillor Dick Wolff, who is also a United Reformed Church pastor, said: “Unfortunately, one of the city council’s licensing officers didn’t recognise that a Passion play on Good Friday was a religious event.”
I think he thought it was a sex show, so he said it may be committing an offence.”

Post a comment

0 Comments